The Resplandy Research Group

  • Phytoplankton bloom near Alaska’s Pribilof Islands

    NASA Earth Observatory images by Jesse Allen and Norman Kuring, using Landsat 8 data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Instrument(s): Landsat 8 - OLI
    Phytoplankton bloom near Alaska’s Pribilof Islands

    Phytoplankton bloom near Alaska’s Pribilof Islands on September 22, 2014. The Pribilofs are surrounded by nutrient-rich waters in the Bering Sea. The milky green and light blue shading of the water indicates the presence of vast populations of microscopic phytoplankton—mostly coccolithophores, which have chalky calcite scales. Such phytoplankton form the foundation of a tremendously productive habitat for fish and birds. Caption by Kasha Patel and Mike Carlowicz.

  • Satellite chorophyll offshore New Zealand (source: NASA Aqua MODIS)

    NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team. Instrument(s): Aqua – MODIS acquired October 25, 2009
    Satellite chorophyll offshore New Zealand (source: NASA Aqua MODIS)

    Satellite chorophyll offshore New Zealand (source: NASA Aqua MODIS).

  • Satellite surface chlorophyll spiraling around eddies in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA image by Norman Kuring, NASA’s Ocean Color web. Instrument(s): Suomi NPP – VIIRS acquired June 9, 2016
    Satellite surface chlorophyll spiraling around eddies in the Gulf of Alaska

    Satellite surface chlorophyll spiraling around eddies in the Gulf of Alaska. Phytoplankton blooms in response to the iron supply by melt water along the coast and transport offshore by eddies. Source: NASA Suomi NPP-VIIRS acquired on June 9th 2016.

  • Satellite chorophyll in the Indian Ocean (source: NASA Aqua MODIS)

    NASA image, NASA Earth Observatory. Instrument(s): Aqua – MODIS
    Satellite chorophyll in the Indian Ocean (source: NASA Aqua MODIS)

    Satellite chorophyll in the Indian Ocean (source: NASA Aqua MODIS).  Eddies and filaments promotes the growth of phytoplankton during the winter monsoon by supplying nutrients and relieving light limitation (Resplandy et al., 2009).

2022 Laure Resplandy headshot

Professor Laure Resplandy is a biogeochemical oceanographer.  Her research goals are to understand how climate and ocean physics influence marine biogeochemistry and ecosystems and how these changes can in turn impact the Earth climate.  Prof. Resplandy's approach is to design and develop numerical models (from ocean regions to global climate system) and statistical tools to interpret in-situ and satellite observations.

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

  • Climate change and global carbon cycle.
     

  • Changes in ocean oxygenation, oxygen minimum zones and coastal hypoxia.
     

  • Influence of ocean physics on ecosystems and biogeochemical fluxes.
     

  • Climate modeling, ocean modeling from small-scale (1-100 km) to large-scale.

IN THE NEWS

Hydrological cycle amplification reshapes warming-driven oxygen loss in the Atlantic Ocean
Jan. 8, 2024

The loss of oxygen from the ocean due to warming is not ubiquitous. In the Atlantic Ocean there has been no oxygen loss or gain in the subtropics over the past six decades (top 1 km, see Figure). Hogikyan and co-authors show that the amplification of the hydrological cycle, a response to climate change that results in a ‘salty-get-saltier,…

Unique ocean circulation reshapes Indian Ocean oxygen minimum zone
Nov. 29, 2023

The global ocean is losing oxygen with warming. Observations and Earth system model projections, however, suggest that this global ocean deoxygenation does not equate to a simple and systematic expansion of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs).